Outdoor Photography and Videography

Tobi Wulff Photography

Home / Essays / 2016 / March / RAW Timelapse Workflow with Darktable and Davinci Resolve

RAW Timelapse Workflow with Darktable and Davinci Resolve

I shot a new timelapse in the mountains, this time exclusively recording all the frames in full resolution and RAW (unlike my previous outdoor timelapse). It was recorded with the Olympus OM-D E-M1 (de) and Olympus 12-40mm F2.8 PRO (de) lens.

Out in the field

Basic outdoor timelapse 101: all manual settings, that is ISO, white balance, aperture, shutter speed. White balance was obviously daylight and I kept the ISO at its minimum (200). Shutter speed should be set to something "video-like". Video and film cameras usually use something called a 180 degree shutter which essentially means that the shutter speed is 1/(2 x frame rate). So for a 24 fps video that means 1/48 or (because photo cameras usually don't offer this setting) 1/50. Anything faster than that runs the risk of making the timelapse feel jittery and too sharp. For fast movements, like people or clouds, I like to go even slower and aim for something like 1/20 - 1/40. This gives the video a more dreamy and pleasing look.

I record every frame in RAW. I like to store JPEGs as well so I can generate a quick timelapse when I get home without having to go through the RAW workflow (described below) first.

To do the actual timelapse recording, there are several option depending on your circumstances and your equipment:

  • Using the camera's in-built timelapse function: most compact solution and works well on the E-M1 except when you want faster than 1 second intervals;
  • using a remote shutter release or remote timer: works great but you have to dial in the intervals using the anti-shock functionality and it's an extra cable flapping in the wind;
  • a slider or panning head triggering the camera: whenever the E-M1 sits on the panning head (see next section), it will receive it's shutter releases from the Genie. The result: accurate intervals perfectly timed with the stops between motions of the moving parts of the timelapse setup.

For filters I often use a graduated ND filter to make the bright sky and the darker ground a bit more even. This is particularly important at sunrise and sunset because the ground will be really dark. I also have a circular polarizer that lives on my lens 95% of the time: vegetation looks more lush, colours more vibrant, and annoying reflections of leaves or glaring surfaces disappear. It can also cut through a lot of haze and mist on a more cloudy day. Time in Pixels just released an excellent article about filters for video with many visual examples.

Getting moving

I've written about my DIY slider before and it is actually undergoing some major upgrades right now to make it more usable and flexible. However, I don't usually take it very far because it is heavy and big. In order to have something that always fits in even the smallest bag, is compact and rugged (not weather-proof, though) and "just works", I got myself a Genie Mini which is actually being developed here in NZ. It's controlled from a smartphone via Bluetooth so setting it up takes a few minutes since my phone is usually off when I'm in the outdoors (no reception anyway) but it's very intuitive and flexible (watch the videos on their website). All the shots in the video at the top of the page that have some side-to-side movement are done with the Genie Mini.

RAW workflow

The out of camera JPEGs are alright but (especially for landscapes) don't look nearly as good as they could when I develop my own final images from RAW: better colours, more dynamic range, more wiggle room in the highlights (and some in the shadows). This is particularly important when photographing sunsets, sunrises, or rapidly changing lighting conditions because the exposure can be adjusted so much in post. I load all my RAWs from one scene into Darktable, then do all my adjustments on one of them (shadows, highlights, general exposure, Velvia/saturation filter, contrast, noise reduction, but no cropping - I can always do that later when editing the video). Then, I copy the settings to all the other RAWs and export everything to bitmap files with a high bit rate, such as 16-bit PNG or TIFF. In theory, one could also make fine adjustments to individual frames at this stage.

Editing

The last step is to edit the photos into a timelapse video and maybe add some music and sound effects. I mainly use Davinci Resolve for editing because it also has colour grading built in but the colours should already be fairly correct and good looking from the last step. Davinci can directly import image sequences (i.e. individual files) and display them as video clips.

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