Outdoor Photography and Videography

Tobi Wulff Photography

Home / Essays / 2016 / March / Shooting on the River

Shooting on the River

A few weeks ago I was shooting photos and a short film on and next to a river while also doing grade 3 whitewater action. This is a quick summary of some gear I used and some helpful tips to keep your gear dry and in good working condition. But first, here is the finished short film about the trip:

Equipment

First and foremost, your equipment has to be stored in a safe way. This means a good water-proof (even when submerged) and to some degree crush-proof case, ideally with foam inserts to protect against shock. Pelican cases have a great reputation and I use the Pelican 1200 Case (de) because it's just the right size for a MFT camera and a decent sized lens plus some accessories. It also fits perfectly behind the seat cushion of the river bug that we are using. Pelican makes cases in a lot of different size, for memory cards, small electronic devices, cameras and up to big carry-on roller cases that themselves weigh 6-8 kgs already. I did a few rolls in the river (as you can see at the end of the video) and everything stayed perfectly dry. The main thing to watch out for is that absolutely nothing gets in between the rubber seal and the lid when closing the case. Many a camera have been lost in the past due to a bit of cloth or a camera strap preventing the seal from working correctly.

I also keep a small micro-fibre towel in the case to absorb puddles and to be able to wipe off any water on gear or your hands. As usual with any photography/video gear, there is also a small lens cloth to wipe off moisture and clean the lens. One lesson I learned - even tough nothing bad happened - is to always put small and vulnerable things like batteries and microphones into zip-lock bags. Sooner or later your camera will get a bit wet or water will drip from you or your equipment into the case so extra protection is required for things that should never ever get wet. It also keeps everything more organised and things can't fall out as easily.

Action cameras (such as my GoPro HERO3: Black Edition (de) ) are of course the main work horses of all thrill seekers and outdoor enthusiasts. I put a piece of paper towel or toilet paper inside the case to absorb moisture - that's basically all the more expensive GoPro absorption papers do. It also helps you verify if everything stayed tightly shut at the end of the day.

Main main camera was the Olympus OM-D E-M1 (de) but in the future it will definitely be the Panasonic LUMIX GH4 (de) with Metabones Canon EF to BMPCC Speed Booster (de) because of its slow-motion ability and better codecs and video features (unless I need a smaller foot print or the IBIS of the E-M1). I couldn't use a good microphone but I think the sound of the river is still ok and luckily there weren't many other sounds to record on location. The E-M1 and PRO lens performed flawlessly in the heavy rain which was great because for basically any other video camera I would've needed an umbrella or camera bag handy whenever I took it out of the case.

Post-processing

Because I've only used the on-camera microphone and also because a GoPro in its water-proof housing doesn't record sound very well, the major "trick" to improve the finished video was to make a good wild river soundtrack and apply it to all the tracks where it made sense, that is where there are rapids and whitewater - but I also left the GoPro sounds (they are more like clicks when hit by a wave) in on a separate track because they give it a more immediate feedback to what is happening visually. The same is true for the sound of the rain on the camera: it doesn't sound great because it's the built-in mic and it's the sound of rain hitting the camera housing but it helps with audience immersion.

Color grading has taken another big step forward in this project: I used Davinci Resolve 12 Lite and the color themes are cool/high-contrast for the bad weather scenes and a warm slightly teal/orange look for the good weather scenes. The GoPro footage was graded to fit well into the surrounding clips but it also has a more realistic and less stylised look. For the supermarket indoor shots I added glow around the highlights to give it a slightly dreamy feel because it is so different to the harsh outdoor and action shots. I will post some before and after color grading shots soon.

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