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Tobi Wulff Photography

Home / Essays / 2016 / April / Fast Editing and Color Grading with a Gaming Mouse

Fast Editing and Color Grading with a Gaming Mouse

There are many control surfaces out there to help with editing and colour grading but they are mostly geared towards professionals and are very expensive. Examples are surfaces from Tangent and Blackmagic.

North RouteburnSunset in the North Routeburn, Aspiring National Park, NZ. Cropping, exposure and contrast adjustments, monochrome processing in Darktable.

For amateurs and enthusiasts there are multiple cheaper options. I've written about my DIY controller for Davinci before but there are also consumer devices that can greatly speed up editing and grading. Because I have to use a mouse anyway (for lack of a complete, fully-features control surface), the Logitech G700s gamging mouse(de) is one of my favourite tools. Its main feature are the four thumb buttons on the left side that can be assigned arbitrary actions or shortcuts through the Logitech software. The configuration is stored in the mouse itself so once set up the Logitech software is no longer needed. This means the settings will work the same on any computer or any operating system. The mouse wheel is kind of special on this mouse because it can be pushed left or right (very useful for scrolling on a timeline), and it can be put in a free spinning mode with the button next to it. This is useful for browsing websites or scrolling through long documents such as the Davinci Manual (PDF).

Edit

For editing I use three of the buttons to switch between Davinci's three edit modes (pointer [shortcut A], trim [T], razor blade [B]). The fourth button is used to toggle snapping on or off since I constantly find myself switching between shifting clips around (in this case I want them to stick to the next clip so that there is no gap) and making fine adjustments to the length of clips or exact cuts. Another good option for those four buttons are the clip modes Insert, Overwrite, Replace, and Place on Top.

The top buttons aren't used as heavily because they are a bit awkward to reach while holding the mouse. At the moment I have the three buttons on the top left set up to set in and out points and to toggle video/audio linking for the selected clip. I almost find the I and O keys on the keyboard easier to reach but I also miss them sometimes when I don't look down. The two buttons in the center of the mouse switch through the profiles and turn the free-spinning mouse wheel on or off.

Colour

The most common action when colour correcting and grading, and the central piece of Davinci's colour page, are the nodes. So I set up the four buttons on the side of the mouse to quickly add serial, parallel, layer nodes, and also to add a serial node before the currently selected one. I haven't found a specific use for the three top buttons yet as there are so many possible shortcuts but none of them are used as often as handling nodes. Maybe I'll go for undo/redo, or for handling clip versions or the gallery.

Summary

Using a gaming mouse together with a few keyboard shortcuts or a simple control surface (I'm looking forward to see what the Tangent Ripple can do) can greatly speed up your editing and colour grading work. If you've only been using a normal three button mouse so far I highly recommend giving a gaming mouse with 7-10 additional buttons a go.

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