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Use a MIDI Controller as a Video Editing and Color Grading Surface

Control surfaces can greatly speed up editing and color grading work and also avoid issues like CTS because your hand can move around more freely instead of clutching a mouse all day. However, like most things in the video/film world, they can be very expensive. At the top end there are full suites like Blackmagic's Davinci (multiple $10,000s), the Avid Artist line (many $1,000s) and smaller devices like the Shuttle Pro V.2 (de) ($129). While they are often very well made and can be worth it if your profession is to produce multimedia every day as efficiently as possible, the actual cost of the functional parts is actually much lower. So I decided to build something similar to the Shuttle Pro but with a few key differences:
  • Sends MIDI messages instead of registering as a keyboard
  • Fewer buttons but a shift function that doubles the number of functions, including the jog/shuttle wheels
  • Different placement so that the hand can rest on the left and easily access buttons on the top and the right

MIDI

The MIDI protocol has been around for decades and is primarily used in the audio and lighting world for input devices and synthesizers. As opposed to using an input device that emulates a keyboard, MIDI has got the advantage that the incoming messages can be easily translated to keyboard shortcuts, whereas an Arduino emulating a keyboard will always send the same shortcuts. This gives much more flexibility, e.g. when changing programs or modes within a program (think media, edit, and colour pages in Davinci Resolve).

Within Resolve, shortcuts can be configured (or are configured by default) for pretty much all functionality apart from curves and colour/lieft/gamma/gain wheels - without a dedicated control surface one still has to use the mouse to modify these parameters. In order to process incoming MIDI messages on Linux I use mididings. I actually gave a talk at KiwiPyCon 2014 about using mididings to control photography (or any) software on Linux. On Windows I wrote my processing code in C++ and used the rtmidi library which is easy to compile (I use MinGW gcc) and comes with many excellent examples.

Assembly

The physical parts come down to a few buttons (cents to a few $), LED(s) (cents) and the jog/shuttle made by ALPS ($15-20). Figuring out the pins on the jog/shuttle was pretty straight-forward but this article goes through the process in more detail and might be useful to anyone trying to get a similar part working. I already had the plastic case and an Arduino to power the project lying around. In order to turn the Arduino into a MIDI device you'll have to replace the firmware on the ATmega used to communicate with the computer via USB (which is different from the main ATmega on an Arduino Uno!). The firmware and detailed instructions can be found on the HIDUINO Github page.

The shuttle controls forward and backward play at different speeds (J, K and L in Resolve) and the jog dial advances or rewinds the playhead one frame at a time (left and right arrow keys).

I still need to figure out a way to make an outer wheel for the shuttle and a knob or inner wheel for the jog rotary encoder. 3D printing might be the best way but first I'll have to learn how to create the virtual parts for it. At least the shuttle and jog wheels have sturdy grooves that should make it fairly easy to attach knobs or wheels to it.

At the moment, the Arduino will be connected to each button, LED and ALPS shuttle/jog through cables that go into the female headers on the little green board. Eventually, the Arduino will have to move into the enclosure and more sturdy, soldered connections between its pins and the components will be made.

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