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Tobi Wulff Photography

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Preparing for a Documentary Shoot with Blackmagic and GH4 - Part 1

The actual production time for my first proper documentary is coming up in a few weeks so I want to start writing about the pre-production process and my experiences as each shooting day happens.

Upskilling

There are so many areas you have to cover as a mostly one-man-band when making a short feature and there is always more to learn. Most of those areas also go hand in hand so even if you want to hand something off to someone else it still pays to learn the basics and get into the editor's head, or the audio guy's head, and of course the camera man's/DP's head.

Over the last year I slowly learned to use Davinci Resolve 12 to edit and color grade, and even though color grading (and editing to some extend but luckily a documentary isn't 100% creativity and some things just fall in chronological order) probably takes decades or a lifetime to master I slowly get the hang of matching shots and giving it a certain look. So while I think that there is lots to learn on an actual big project I've also got the basics to tackle a short film. Really useful tutorials I used to learn the skills are the Youtube tutorial videos of Casey Faris and Miesner Media. The official Resolve manual is very content-rich and well written. It is definitely worth a read if you're serious about using the program to produce films - at least it should be handy as a reference document.

For dealing with RAW timelapses and turning it into an edited and color graded video the recent mountain timeapse was a good exercise.

Equipment

I've slowly gathered all (most? acquiring equipment never ends) of my equipment over the last few months and am now ready to shoot a variety of scenes in different weather and lighting conditions. The cameras and how I plan to use them:

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera with Metabones speedbooster and full-frame or APS-C lenses (from 11mm to 105mm, some of that with optical stabilisation): use whenever feasible because it produces the best image but it won't shoot slow motion. It is also too heavy to go running with (unless way stripped down) and therefore won't work on my Roxant stabilizer.

GH4 with speedbooster and full-frame or APS-C lenses: due to the different crop factor gives slightly different focal lengths than the BMPCC. Can shoot 4K and slow motion so will be used when those features are necessary. Is also more rugged (see my test in the rain here) and works on the stabilizer with a small MFT lens. The GH4 has decent audio input (as long as the pre-amps are turned down) so I don't necessarily need a separate audio recorder - something that is absolutely required with the BMPCC.

GoPro Hero 3: I don't like the image of the GoPros that much but it is a great little camera and can do super wide-angle shots, good slow motion, and fit in tight corners where other cameras won't go. I plan to use it for timelapses with a tiny rig (e.g. on a Gorilla pod) and to leave it outside for longer periods without having to worry about it too much.

Either one of those or a photography camera like the Olympus E-M1 will also be used to shoot timelapses without using any of the precious video equipment.

I've experimented a lot with rigs from Smallrig and will write a post at some point about the specific parts. At the moment I'm still swaying back and worth between more parts and attachments and a smaller rig so I don't want to finalise it just yet. What I can say, though, is that a minimal cage works best for small HDSLRs like the BMPCC and GH4, and Nato rails and top handles are amazing.

What's next

The next step is to shoot a daytrip in the outdoors where we prepare the course for the event. It will involve using the stabiliser and trying to record good audio while being on the move.

Until then, here again is the clip from last year's event:


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